The German Galileo Test and Development Environment

GATE Test Range

The development of products, services and applications is a key factor for the commercial success of a satellite navigation system. GATE is a unique outdoor test- and development environment for the emerging Galileo & GPS satellite navigation market. Consisting of eight virtual „Galileo satellites“ located on top of several mountains around the GATE test area in Berchtesgaden (Germany), a well suited topology is available to support different testing scenarios. GATE closes the gap between laboratory based constellation simulations and the real-world Galileo system, with its 18 satellites IOC constellation planned to be available in 2015/2016.

Test your products and applications today with GATE to be ready for Galileo tomorrow!

 

GATE Operation

Since 2008 it is already possible for companies and research institutes to perform their Galileo experiments with GATE. After completion of its extension to eight transmitting stations the test range was officially opened in Febuary 2011. GATE will be operational under the responsibility of IFEN GmbH presumably at least until the end of 2016. 
For further details please contact IFEN GmbH. 

GATE Test Range

GATE Test Range

The GATE test bed cornerstones are eight ground transmitters, emitting the Galileo signals into the test area in the region of Berchtesgaden (Germany). Two monitoring stations located within the test area are receiving and processing these signals. A central processing facility which is the core of GATE is steering and controlling the signals transmitted. These Galileo signals are fully compliant to the Galileo OS ICD specification. With the GATE "Virtual Satellite Mode" a realistic moving Galileo satellite constellation can be simulated, supporting commercial Galileo receivers without any modification. Furthermore, the integration of additional sensors like odometer or inertial sensors allows testing of sophisticated integrated navigation systems and applications under realistic environmental and dynamic conditions, e.g. including multipath and interference effects. The four Galileo IOV satellites available from 2012 onwards can be used in combination with the eight GATE "satellites", enabling up to twelve visible Galileo satellites, thus reflecting a complete Galileo FOC constellation. With full control over the eight GATE "Galileo satellites", feared events can be simulated enabling evaluation of new user integrity (RAIM) algorithmic concepts and implementations.